COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Vaccine

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT ON THE USE OF THE JOHNSON & JOHNSON VACCINE:

As of 4/13/2021, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is on hold. Any planned clinics with J&J are postponed until further notice from the CDC, FDA, and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). All DHD#10 clinic appointments listed on our scheduling page are for the 2-dose Pfizer or Moderna vaccine only.

CURRENT ONLINE SCHEDULE

ANYONE 16 AND OLDER CAN NOW SCHEDULE ONLINE
All individuals 16 and older can now schedule online (no medical condition required). 16- and 17-year olds can schedule themselves, but must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian when receiving the vaccine or will be turned away. We ask that you reside in one of our counties due to vaccine allocation limits: CRAWFORD, KALKASKA, LAKE, MANISTEE, MASON, MECOSTA, MISSAUKEE, NEWAYGO, OCEANA, AND WEXFORD. College students temporarily residing in one of our counties are eligible to receive the COVID-19 from us also. 

If you do not have access to a computer, call 888-217-3904 for assistance.

If no dates or times are available (they will be unbolded), then all clinics are full.  Check back next week for more dates. You can schedule yourself in any of our ten counties, but you must go to the same location for your second dose.

Anyone 16 and older, click on the link below to schedule an appointment

SELECT A BOLDED DATE AND A TIME AND COMPLETE THE FORM. IF NO BOLDED DATES, CHECK BACK NEXT WEEK. DATES ARE ADDED WEEKLY.

If you are 16 or 17 years old, you must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian when receiving your vaccine or you will be turned away.

CURRENT WAITING LISTS

PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS IN EACH SECTION AND BOX CAREFULLY BEFORE PROCEEDING.

If you do not have access to a computer, call 888-217-3904 for assistance.

Healthcare Workers, Frontline/Essential Workers, Adults 65+, and Homebound, click on the link below and complete the form

Individuals on this list will be moved daily to the top of the list for priority scheduling into clinics directly by DHD#10 staff. You will be contacted via the email and/or the phone number you provided to schedule your appointment.

Johnson & Johnson Waitlist, click on link below and complete form

We will be offering the Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) vaccine to the general public shortly. Please complete the form to place yourself on our waiting list and you will be notified as soon as clinic appointments are available.

2nd Dose Waitlist, click on link below and complete form

If you received your 1st dose from a different provider and are in need of your 2nd dose, please complete the form and someone will contact you directly to schedule your. appointment.
If you receive your 1st dose from DHD#10, you will be scheduled for your 2nd dose automatically so you do not need to put yourself on this waitlist.

Frontline/Essential Large Employers with 30 or more employees ONLY,
click on link below and complete form

Frontline/essential businesses that have 30 or more employees wanting to be vaccinated, please have one individual fill out the interest survey form. We will contact you directly to schedule your staff.

If you have a scheduled appointment, you can assist us with filling out the paperwork prior to coming for your appointment. Fill out THIS FORM and bring it with you to your appointment. If you do not have access to a printer, you can fill it out when you arrive to your appointment. THIS FORM IS NOT FOR REGISTERING AN APPOINTMENT. IT IS ONLY THE PAPERWORK NEEDED TO RECEIVE YOUR VACCINE WHEN YOU ARE SCHEDULED.

Items to bring to your appointmentDriver’s License or Photo ID and Insurance Card

The COVID-19 Vaccine is FREE. If you have insurance, we will bill it for an administration fee. If insurance does not pay it, you will not be billed. There is no out-of-pocket expense whatsoever. 

ALL VACCINE CLINICS ARE BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. NO WALK-INS PLEASE.

Please sign up for our Public Health Alert to receive the most current information on the COVID-19 Vaccine.

ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE

In an effort to provide more insight, DHD#10 Medical Director, Dr. Jennifer Morse, produced some helpful videos on the mRNA vaccine and on the development and safety of the COVID-19 vaccine. 

Infographic on developing the COVID-19 vaccine
Infographic on mRNA vaccine

SECOND DOSES

The mRNA COVID-19 vaccine series consist of two doses administered intramuscularly:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech (30 µg, 0.3 ml each): 3 weeks (21 days) apart
  • Moderna (100 µg, 0.5 ml): 1 month (28 days) apart

Persons should not be scheduled to receive the second dose earlier than recommended (i.e., 3 weeks [Pfizer-BioNTech] or 1 month [Moderna]). However, second doses administered within a grace period of 4 days earlier than the recommended date for the second dose are still considered valid. Doses inadvertently administered earlier than the grace period should not be repeated.

The second dose should be administered as close to the recommended interval as possible. However, if it is not feasible to adhere to the recommended interval, the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines may be scheduled for administration up to 6 weeks (42 days) after the first dose. There are currently limited data on efficacy of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines administered beyond this window. If the second dose is administered beyond these intervals, there is no need to restart the series.

COVID-19 DATA DASHBOARD

For the most up-to-date data on COVID-19 Vaccine distribution, MDHHS now has a COVID-19 Vaccine Dashboard. MDHHS is tracking the number of enrolled providers, vaccines shipped, doses administered, and doses by vaccine. You can see the numbers overall for the state, or select your region, local health department, provider, or county for more detailed information.

COVID-19 VACCINE FAQs 

Will COVID-19 vaccination help keep me from getting COVID-19?

Getting vaccinated yourself may also protect people around you, particularly people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. COVID-19 can have serious, life-threatening complications, and there is no way to know how COVID-19 will affect you. And if you get sick, you could spread the disease to friends, family, and others around you. Wearing masks and social distancing help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others, but these measures are not enough. Vaccines will work with your immune system so it will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Stopping the pandemic requires using all the tools we have available.

Is there a cost to get vaccinated?

No fees will be charged to get vaccinated. There will be no cost sharing from insurance plans. Vaccine doses purchased with U.S. taxpayer dollars will be given to the American people at no cost. COVID-19 providers agree to administer vaccine regardless of an individual’s ability to pay and regardless of their coverage status, and may not seek any reimbursement, including through balance billing, from a vaccine recipient. However, vaccine providers will be able to charge administration fees for giving or administering the shot to someone. Vaccine providers can get this fee reimbursed by the patient’s public or private insurance company or, for uninsured patients, by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Provider Relief Fund.

Will more than one dose of COVID-19 vaccine be required?

Yes. The current vaccines need two shots to be effective. It is very important that you receive the vaccine from the same manufacturer both times and get the doses within the required time frame to ensure the best protection from COVID-19. If you receive the Pfizer vaccine the second dose needs to be 21 days after the first dose, and the second dose of the Moderna vaccine needs to be 28 days after the first.

How will I be reminded to get the second dose?

DHD#10 is scheduling your second dose vaccine at your first dose appointment. COVID-19 vaccination record cards (reminder cards) will be provided when you receive the COVID-19 vaccine. The card provides room for a written reminder for a second-dose appointment. If you have a smartphone, consider taking a photo of your vaccination record and entering the date the next vaccine dose is due in your calendar.

To ensure the best protection from COVID-19, it is very important to not skip the second dose. The second dose must be from the same vaccine manufacturer, so it will be important to ensure that where you receive your second dose has the right vaccine. If you can, it would be best to follow up with the same provider who gave you your first shot.

Can any doctor’s office, clinic, or pharmacy offer the COVID-19 vaccine?

Initially, the federal government will distribute a limited supply of vaccine to each state. Michigan has allocated this limited supply to hospitals and health care settings where workers have contact with patients. Long term care facilities where some of the most vulnerable people live will also receive supply, which will be distributed through pharmacies and local health departments with support from the Michigan National Guard.

Doctor’s offices, clinics, and pharmacies who are enrolled in the vaccination program can offer the vaccine when the vaccine becomes available to them. As supply increases, doctor’s offices, clinics, and pharmacies will be able to obtain the vaccine directly, hopefully in late Spring 2021.

Will people who have already had COVID-19 be able to get vaccinated?

Yes. People who have had COVID-19 can still get a vaccine. CDC recommends getting it after you have recovered. You should check with your health care provider if you have questions.

If I already had COVID-19, should I get vaccinated? Shouldn’t I be immune?

Yes, you should still get the COVID-19 vaccine, even if you have had COVID-19. There is not enough information currently available to say if or for how long after infection someone is protected from getting COVID-19 again; this is called natural immunity. Early evidence suggests natural immunity from COVID-19 may not last very long, but more studies are needed to better understand this.

Do I need to keep wearing a mask after I get vaccinated?

Yes. Michiganders should continue to wear masks, social distance from those not in their household and wash their hands, even after receiving vaccine. More information is available on the CDC website in their FAQ document posted at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html

Is the vaccine safe?

We understand that some people may be concerned about getting vaccinated. Safety is the first priority. The process used to approve the COVID-19 vaccines is the same proven process that was used to create safe and effective vaccines for the flu, polio, measles, whooping cough and more. While the COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine authorized or approved for use.
More information about the safety of the COVID-19 vaccine is available at the CDC and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) website:
• CDC Vaccine Benefits website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/vaccine-benefits.html
• CDC Vaccine Safety website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety.html
• CHOP website: https://www.chop.edu/centers-programs/vaccine-education-center/making-vaccines/prevent-covid

Can any doctor’s office, clinic, or pharmacy offer the COVID-19 vaccine?

Doctor’s offices, clinics, and pharmacies who are enrolled in the vaccination program can offer the vaccine when the vaccine becomes available to them. Initially the federal government will distribute a limited supply of vaccine to each state. Michigan will allocate this limited supply to hospitals and health care settings where workers have contact with patients. Later distribution will be coordinated through local health departments, and eventually as supply increases doctor’s offices, clinics, and pharmacies will be able to obtain the vaccine directly.

Will people who have already had COVID-19 be able to get vaccinated?

There is not enough information currently available to say if or for how long after infection someone is protected from getting COVID-19 again; this is called natural immunity. Early evidence suggests natural immunity from COVID-19 may not last very long, but more studies are needed to better understand this. Until we have a vaccine available and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) makes recommendations to CDC on how to best use COVID-19 vaccines, there will not be any information available on whether people who had COVID-19 should get a COVID-19 vaccine.
More information is available on the CDC website in their FAQ document.

Is the vaccine safe?

We understand that some people may be concerned about getting vaccinated once a COVID-19 vaccine is available in the United States. The process used to approve the COVID-19 vaccines is the same proven process that was used to create safe and effective vaccines for the flu, polio, measles, pertussis (whooping cough) and more. While these vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible through the help of global cooperation and unprecedented public and private funding, our routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use. Safety is a top priority. The U.S. vaccine safety system ensures that all vaccines are as safe as possible.

How can a safe vaccine be made so quickly?

Vaccine development typically takes many years. However, scientists had already begun research for coronavirus vaccines during previous outbreaks caused by related coronaviruses (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome). That earlier research provided a head start for rapid development of vaccines to protect against infection with COVID-19. No steps were skipped in the development of this vaccine but modifications to the process were made to shorten the timeline without sacrificing safety, such as:
• Overlapping phase I and phase II clinical trials. Phase I studies include a small number of people and evaluate whether the vaccine causes an immune response and is safe. Scientists looked at data from a group of people in phase I as phase II was progressing to make these evaluations.
• While completing large phase III trials, manufacturers began producing the vaccine, so that if it were shown to be safe and effective, they would have large numbers of doses ready.
• While waiting for a vaccine to be ready, many other aspects of vaccine delivery were prepared (e.g., developing plans for how to distribute the first, limited quantities available, ensuring adequate supplies for distributing and administering vaccine.)
More information is available at the CHOP website: https://www.chop.edu/navigating-covid-19-resources-parents.

Can this vaccine give me COVID-19?

No. This vaccine gives your body a code which helps it recognize the virus, so your body can fight it off in the future.

Can I get other vaccines at the same time as a COVID-19 vaccine?

CDC recommends that no other vaccine be given 14 days before or after you get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Can women who are pregnant get the COVID-19 vaccine?

The CDC has recommended that pregnant women and women planning to become pregnant may be offered the vaccine, if they are in one of the vaccine priority groups and in consultation with their health care provider.

Are there any tests people have to get before getting the vaccine?

The CDC is not recommending a routine pregnancy test or an antibody blood test for COVID-19 before you get the vaccine. You should talk with your health care provider about any questions you have due to your personal, specific medical history.

Does the vaccine have any side effects?

After COVID-19 vaccination, you may have some mild side effects. This is a normal sign that your body is building protection. The side effects from COVID-19 vaccination may feel like flu and might even affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Your arm may be sore, red, or warm to the touch. You may experience a low-grade fever, headache, and just a general feeling of “not yourself”. These are signs that your immune system is doing exactly what it is supposed to, which is produce an immune response for you to have protection against this disease.

If you have additional questions, you can contact us at the MDHHS COVID Hotline at 1-888-535-6136.

Can people with a history of allergic reactions get the vaccine?

Most people who have food or environmental allergies can still get the vaccine. Prior to getting vaccinated, talk to your health care provider if you have had any severe reactions to medicines or vaccines in the past. Learn more about COVID-19 vaccines and rare and severe allergic reactions. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/allergic-reaction.html

How are side effects being tracked?

The CDC runs the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) https://vaers.hhs.gov/index.html, a national system to detect any possible symptoms or side effects that occur after someone has had a vaccine. Anyone who has had a vaccine can report concerns to VAERS.

What is V-safe?

When you get your vaccine, you will get a link to access the “V-safe After Vaccination Health Checker” for your phone. Through V-safe, you can quickly tell the CDC if you have any side effects after getting the COVID-19 vaccine. CDC may follow up by phone to get more information. V-safe will also remind you to get the second COVID-19 vaccine dose when needed.

When will the vaccine be available?

Michigan began receiving vaccine the week of December 14th. Due to the limited supply, MDHHS has prioritized how the vaccine will be distributed. Supply of the vaccine will increase substantially over the next few months. Those eligible to receive the vaccine will progress as supply increases.

Can I get the second dose of the vaccine in a different state than where I got the first dose?

It’s important to get the second dose of the same vaccine in the time frame required for your vaccine. You might be able to get that in a different state, but you should check before traveling to ensure availability in that state. Consult that state’s COVID-19 vaccine website. Make sure you have your immunization records, including the card when you get your first dose.

Who will get the vaccine first?

Distribution of the vaccine in Michigan will be in a phased approach because it will be several months before supply increases enough to vaccinate everyone.

The CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) have defined different vaccination phases. The ACIP recently voted to update interim vaccine allocation recommendations. For further information review, The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ Updated Interim Recommendation for Allocation of COVID-19 Vaccine.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm695152e2.htm?s_cid=mm695152e2_e&ACSTrackingID=USCDC_921-DM45302&ACSTrackingLabel=MMWR%20Early%20Release%20-%20Vol.%2069%2C%20De

Do we have to wait for one group to be vaccinated before the next group can receive vaccine? How long will it take to move between phases?

Vaccination of groups in one phase will likely not be complete before vaccination in another phase begins. Vaccination in these phases will likely overlap.

The timing of the start of vaccination in a phase is dependent on the guidance from CDC or ACIP, supply of vaccine from the manufacturer, how vaccine is allocated from the federal level to Michigan, and capacity to administer the vaccine to populations.

We hope to be able to offer vaccination to all individuals age 16 or older in Michigan in late spring. Individuals 16 and 17 years of age will need to receive the Pfizer vaccine only. The Moderna vaccine is only recommended for those 18 years and older.

Why are the phases changing?

MDHHS has revised the implementation schedule in order to achieve the following goals:
• Efficiency. In order to vaccinate rapidly, MDHHS has limited the use of complex eligibility rules, including rules for determining who is a frontline or essential worker. For the next stage of the rollout, MDHHS has limited the Phase 1B essential workers category to workers who have high levels of personal exposure (Phase 1B, Group B).

• Effectiveness. While moving quickly, MDHHS is also targeting vaccine to those at greatest risk. To date, 80% of deaths have occurred among those 65 and older. In addition to vaccinating Michiganders who are 75+ in Phase 1B (Phase 1B, Group A), MDHHS is accelerating to vaccinate individuals 65-74 years old in Phase 1C,

• Equity. In this phase, MDHHS is accelerating implementation of vaccination of 65-74 years due to concern around disparity in life expectancy by race/ethnicity for this group (Phase 1C, Group A). The simplicity of criteria will limit differential access to system based on income or privilege.

How is this following ACIP?

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) guidance and recommendations regarding COVID-19 vaccination phases can be found here. Currently, we are ensuring that all of phase 1A is vaccinated as recommended by the ACIP. There are times in which you may see an overlap of phases. One phase will not necessarily be completed before moving onto another phase. This is referred to as “gating.” Recently ACIP gave additional guidance on phase 1B and 1C. MDHHS updated their prioritization guidance to reflect this. MDHHS has expanded and moved to recommending all those 65 years and older be vaccinated with COVID-19 vaccine. We have expanded further to ensure all those who are higher risk due to age are vaccinated. This still falls within the guidance provided by ACIP but altered slightly the order at which people are being vaccinated.

I am a Phase 1A worker, can I still get a vaccine?

Yes. As we move forward through phases and open our vaccination services more, we can still ensure that all eligible persons from previous phases and those who missed opportunities during any phase can be vaccinated. ACIP has put forth guidance that states it is not necessary to vaccinate all individuals in one phase before initiating the next phase; phases may overlap.

I am a Health Care Provider, and I haven't been vaccinated yet, what do I do?

If you are a health care provider who hasn’t been vaccinated and you are part of a larger health system, you need to reach out to your employer to see if they have a plan in place on when and how you can get vaccinated. They will help guide you through their COVID-19 vaccination plan and assist you with when and how you can receive vaccine.
If you are not part of a health system and need to be vaccinated, you should reach out to your local health department to schedule to get vaccinated. Please do not call the health department but go to www.Michigan.gov/COVIDvaccine to find out how to schedule an appointment to receive the vaccine.

How do I sign up to get vaccinated?

First you need to be sure that you fall within the priority group currently recommended to receive vaccine. You can determine what priority group you are in and if you are eligible to receive vaccine at this time by reviewing the the priority guidance listed under Vaccine Distribution on this page. To make an appointment to receive your vaccine, do not call the health department but click on the appropriate link at the top of this page to get on the waiting list for your priority group. If you do not see a link for your group posted, please check back as they will be added when DHD#10 is ready to prioritize your group.

How can I stay informed on the latest information from DHD#10?

If you haven’t already, sign up for our Public Health Alert on our website at www.dhd10.org/subsribe. Also follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/DHD10.