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Condomology? Say What?

Condomology is an initiative by the American Sexual Health Association to ensure that the facts about condoms are available and understood by all, so people can make informed choices about their sexual health. There’s lots to know about condom use (and this is only one of the many methods of birth control). Good thing DHD#10 is here to help!

Here are a few frequently asked questions about condoms: 

Are condoms effective at preventing pregnancy?

Yes. When used consistently and correctly condoms are 98% effective at preventing pregnancy.

Are condoms effective at preventing sexually transmitted infections?

Yes. Condoms have been proven to provide protection against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In fact, condoms are the only contraceptive method that also provides STI protection. Condoms provide different levels of risk reduction for different STIs because infections are spread differently— some are spread by contact with bodily fluids while others are spread by skin to skin contact. In general, research shows that condoms are most effective in preventing those STIs that are spread by bodily fluids, such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, and HIV. Condoms also can reduce the risk of contracting diseases spread by skin-to-skin contact, such as herpes and HPV. However, condoms only can protect against these diseases if the sores are in areas covered by the condom.

How much do condoms cost? Can I afford to use them?

Condoms cost about $1 per condom or free at lots of health centers and bars. DHD#10 can provide free or low-cost condoms!

What are the side effects of using condoms?

Positive “side effects”?  There are lots of things about birth control that are good for your body as well as your sex life: protects against STIs, including HIV, cheap and easy to get a hold of, no prescription necessary! Other side effects: latex allergy, sensitivity to certain brands, or sensitivity during sex.


Learn the rest of the ins and outs of condom use at


How to Use a Male Condom

How to Use a Female Condom