Syringe Service Program (SSP)

District Health Department #10 (DHD#10) is now offering a free, walk-in, anonymous, and confidential Syringe Service Program (SSP)/Harm Reduction Services in our offices, not including Missaukee County, during normal business hours.

Individuals can request a Safe Use Kit(s) via our front desk staff and the kit contains:
  • Syringes
  • Alcohol Swabs
  • Sterile Water
  • Cookers
  • Cottons
  • Tourniquets
  • Fentanyl Test Strips
  • Condoms 
  • Educational Resources
Click here for a program flyer.

Harm Reduction Services aim to reduce the negative effects associated with drug use. IV drug use is a serious issue and one that impacts our communities. In addition to the risk of addiction and overdose, it puts people at risk of hepatitis C and HIV infection, along with skin, blood, and heart infections, as well as many other health risks.

What are the benefits of an SSP? 

  • Reduce HIV prevalence by as much as 50%
  • Reduce hepatitis C prevalence by as much has 50%
  • SSP participants have been shown to be up to 5 times more likely to access substance use disorder and recovery services and stay enrolled in those services than others who inject drugs and are not utilizing an SSP program
  • Increase the proper disposal of syringes and hazardous materials
  • Increase access to substance use disorder treatment and recovery services
  • Reduce accidental needle sticks by 66% in law enforcement professionals

Sharps Disposal Program

District Health Department #10 has a Sharps Disposal Program available.
Program details include:
– Open Monday through Friday, 8:30am – 4:30pm, at all DHD#10 offices
– Syringes/needles must be in a standard sharps container or a laundry detergent jug that is taped shut and labeled “sharps”
– Loose sharps/needles will only be accepted in the outdoor disposal box and in small quantities
– FREE sharps containers are available
– Medications will NOT be accepted

Sharps Disposal Flyer – 10 County (Click Here)

Naloxone (Narcan)

Naloxone is a life-saving medication that can reverse an overdose from opioids, including heroin, fentanyl, and prescription opioid medications when given in time. Naloxone is easy to use and small to carry. Click here to learn more about Naloxone, what it is, why it’s important, how it works, and how to use it.

Free Naloxone (Narcan) Locations
Click here to locate free Naloxone (Narcan) sites in your community. 


Naloxone Fact Sheets for Healthcare Providers
Clinicians play an important role in raising awareness about Naloxone. Click here to learn more about how to talk to your patients and their family, friends, and caregivers about the benefits of Naloxone.

Protect Friends and Family with Lifesaving Naloxone (video)

Frequently Asked Questions About Naloxone
Naloxone Fact Sheet

Never Use Alone

  • https://neverusealone.com/
  • 1-877-696-1996
  • If you’re going to use by yourself call Never Use Alone. You will be asked your first name, location, and the number you are calling from. An operator will stay on the line with you while you use. If you stop responding after using, the operator will notify emergency medical services (EMS) of an unresponsive person at your location.

Treatment Resources

Resource Sheets

Recovery Supports

https://www.drugfreenorthernmichigan.net/recovery/recovery-supports.html
– Looking for support in your recovery? Give NMSAS Recovery Center a call:
– NMSAS Recovery Center Peer Recovery Support Services: 989-370-7608
– Tory Werth: twerth@nmsas.org
– Kelly Korson: kkorson@nmsas.org

Fentanyl

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is up to 50 times stronger than heroin and 100 times stronger than morphine. It is a major contributor to fatal and nonfatal overdoses in the U.S.

 

Fentanyl Test Strips

Fentanyl test strips (FTS) are a low-cost method of helping prevent drug overdoses and reducing harm. Click the link below (or click here) to learn more about Fentanyl Test Strips, why it’s important to have access to them, and how to use them.

https://www.cdc.gov/stopoverdose/fentanyl/fentanyl-test-strips.html

Stigma

Words Matter – Click the video below to learn about how the words and labels we use can either hurt or heal.

Words Matter: Preferred Language for Talking About Addiction
With simple changes in language harmful stigma and negativity around SUD can be reduced or avoided. Read on to learn more about what stigma is, how it affects people with SUD, and how you can help make a change.

FAN Stigma Workbook
I’m Still A Person – The Stigma of Substance use & Power of Respect Workbook is an interactive workbook created to help give people the knowledge required to address substance use-related stigma within themselves, their families, and their communities. Click here to download a copy of the workbook.

HR Conference Flyer (1)